Domestic violence and abuse: how should doctors and nurses respond?

Gene FederBy Gene Feder
GP and Professor of Primary Care
Centre for Academic Primary Care

Domestic violence and abuse (DVA) is a violation of human rights with long-term health consequences, from chronic pain to mental ill-health. It is a global public health challenge, requiring political and educational intervention to drive prevention, as well as a robust criminal justice response. But what is required from front line doctors and nurses, beyond the requirement to respond with clinical competence and compassion to survivors of DVA presenting with, for example, acute injuries, pelvic pain or PTSD? What are the arguments and the evidence for an extended role for clinicians, as articulated in the NICE guidelines on DVA and the WHO guidelines on intimate partner and sexual violence, requiring specific training on DVA and the resources for referral of patients experiencing DVA to specialist DVA services?

A crucial argument and evidence source, as we … Read more

Get inspired – step out of your comfort zone

Medina Johnson_2By Medina Johnson

IRIS National Implementation Manager
Next Link Domestic Abuse Services
Research Collaborator, Centre for Academic Primary Care

Being neither an academic nor a general practitioner, I arrived feeling something like a fish out of water at the RCGP annual conference last month in Glasgow. My colleagues and I had won one of the categories of the RCGP’s Research Paper of the Year award with our paper about women’s experiences of referral to a domestic violence advocate and I was invited to give a short presentation in the wonderfully named “Winners’ Enclosure” section of the conference.

As I trotted, albeit nervously, up to the lectern (I’m going along with the “Winners’ Enclosure” analogy here!) I was reminded how easy it is for us to all stay within our own comfort zone whether that be professionally or personally. I had never presented on a paper before. I had never … Read more

Research and activism – the challenge of remaining connected

Alison GregoryBy Dr Alison Gregory
Research Associate
Centre for Academic Primary Care

It’s easy to lose enthusiasm for your job if you’ve been doing it for many years, but when I attended the annual conference of the European Network on Gender and Violence last week, I was struck by the level of passion the delegates continue to have for their work, even after decades of working in their field.

The network was set up to support the exchange of ideas and to encourage collaboration among scholars and professionals who address violence, gender, violence prevention and related issues across Europe.

Nadia Khelaifat and I attended the meeting as young scholars from the Centre for Academic Primary Care (CAPC) at the University of Bristol to talk about our PhD work in the areas of domestic violence (DV) and migrant women, and the impacts on the friends and family members of DV survivors. In … Read more